GQ says the Bible is one of the most overrated books

Before I get to the GQ article, I also wanted to share that while I was watching “Fox and Friends” this morning, there was a segment where Dr. Oz was interviewed because of his heroic effort when he stopped to help after seeing a bus on fire on the side of the road.   It wasn’t the first time he had done this.  In the past, he also stopped upon seeing other accidents that had happened; in an effort to help anyone who may have needed to be rescued.  His decision to help (while many cars just drove past the burning bus) is quite admirable.

However, during the Fox and Friends interview, he said something that I thought was very odd.  While discussing the concept of evil, he said,   “Evil is not when bad people do bad things.  That is going to happen.  Evil is when good people watch bad people do bad things.”

What???  Isn’t evil both of those things?  Dr. Oz only focused on just one concept (his own belief, apparently) of evil and that sounded very odd to me.

Dictionary.com attempts to explain the term “evil,” but noticeably avoids any reference to the Bible’s definitions/explanations about the term and the source of it.

The Blue Letter Bible search of the term “evil” shows that “evil”
occurs 485 times in 457 verses in the NKJV.
Page 1 / 10 exact matches
(Gen 2:9–Jdg 9:57)

So, why would Dictionary.com not include at least some reference to the Bible regarding that term?  Maybe even one like this verse:

Unchecked Copy BoxJhn 3:19“And this is the condemnation, that the light has come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil.

Perhaps Todd Starnes latest article, The Bible gets a bad review from GQ Magazine — Although it’s the bestselling book in history helps explain not only why an online dictionary editor might make the choice to eliminate any reference of the term “evil” being discussed and defined by the Bible, but also why a magazine like “GQ” would choose to give a bad review about the best selling book in history!

Excerpt from the GQ article:

“The Holy Bible is rated very highly by all the people who supposedly live by it but who in actuality have not read it. Those who have read it know there are some good parts, but overall it is certainly not the finest thing that man has ever produced. It is repetitive, self-contradictory, sententious, foolish, and even at times ill-intentioned.”

Starne’s reply is quite humorous and shares the GQ editor’s foolishness as well:

As a longtime Southern Baptist, I’ve grown accustomed to such foolish declarations from the “enlightened” crowd. I suspect the highbrow editors at GQ Magazine would not know the difference between John the Baptist and Balaam’s Ass.

There are many Bible passages and verses that I could cite here. One of the best is John Chapter 8. Many people know one or two familiar verses from that chapter:

John 8:31
Then Jesus said to those Jews who believed Him, “If you abide in My word, you are My disciples indeed.
John 8:32
“And you shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.”

But I suggest reading the entire chapter because it is one of many segments in the Bible that shares the Gospel of Truth; and yet, the ending verse of the chapter shows how easily unrepentant men will reject Jesus and the truth that He shares.

Todd Starnes writes:

The truth is the Bible documents the greatest story ever told – a story about agape love and sacrifice and redemption – everlasting life.

And it’s also the best-selling book of all time – more than 5 billion copies sold, according to Guinness World Records, which also reports that the whole Bible has been translated into 349 languages and says at least one book of the Bible has been translated into 2,123 languages. Statistics Brain estimates even more Bibles have been printed – just over 6 billion.

“The Holy Bible is God-breathed, it is living and active, and it is sharper than a double-edged sword,” the Rev. Franklin Graham wrote on Facebook. “There is nothing more powerful, and there’s nothing more needed by mankind than the Word of God.”

Graham, the president of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, explained that the subject of the Bible from Genesis to Revelation is Jesus Christ.

“And one day soon, every knee will bow and every tongue confess that He is Lord,” he declared.

Now far be it from me to tell the pompous, erudite, literary crowd at GQ Magazine what books they should and should not read, but they might want to glance at John 3:16 before they kick the bucket. It states “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.”

Hat tip:  Todd Starnes article at Fox News.

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9 Responses to “GQ says the Bible is one of the most overrated books”

  1. GMpilot Says:

    Welcome back, hostess.
    Considering how long you were gone, I’d wondered if you were ill, on vacation, or just lying low.

    Now, then:

    …during the Fox and Friends interview, [Dr, Oz] said something that I thought was very odd. While discussing the concept of evil, he said, “Evil is not when bad people do bad things. That is going to happen. Evil is when good people watch bad people do bad things.”

    ”What??? Isn’t evil both of those things? Dr. Oz only focused on just one concept (his own belief, apparently) of evil and that sounded very odd to me.”

    It sounds to me that Dr. Oz was spinning Edmund Burke’s famous line, “All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” If good people watch bad people do bad things, and that’s all they do, isn’t that ‘evil’?

    Dictionary.com attempts to explain the term “evil,” but noticeably avoids any reference to the Bible’s definitions/explanations about the term and the source of it.

    Why would Dictionary.com give more credence to the Bible than, say, the Upanishads? Also, we already know the source of evil; that very same Bible of yours says so. And we can’t have Dictionary.com telling us that, now can we?

    So, why would Dictionary.com not include at least some reference to the Bible regarding that term? Maybe even one like this verse:

    Because then Dictionary might have to include a verse like this: So the Lord relented from the harm which He said He would do to His people.
    The original KJ uses the actual word evil instead of harm. I see why you prefer it. But “doing harm” to someone is still evil. Tell us again who’s ‘mak[ing] the choice to eliminate any reference of the term “evil” being discussed and defined by the Bible’!

    I believe I’ve mentioned this before, but I’ll say it again: most copies of the Bible are not sold—they are given away,, to travelers, soldiers, and people in distant lands where Christians feel the need to distribute them. Often disaster victims receive them too, in lieu of food, medicine or clothing. Eighty-dollar Bibles with full-color illustrations and silk bookmarks are for those already ‘blessed’ with the money to afford them, and the other kind are often New Testament only—some Christians would have you believe there is no such thing as an Old Testament.
    But those copies that are given away legally constitute as a ‘sale’, putting Bible distribution in the same category as street drugs–giving away a joint is considered a ‘sale’ by the police.
    Its ‘bestseller’ claim proves nothing. In any other context, you’d be telling me that!

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  2. christinewjc Says:

    A brief explanation of my absence from this blog? Answer: Because I’m a busy Nana! Also, my daughter, granddaughter and I went back east to celebrate my mom’s 94th birthday. We made it a “Roaring Twenties” themed party and all the guests dressed up with the accessories worn at that time. She loved it!

    I will likely take additional long breaks from posting at this blog. Eventually, I may discontinue posting. You might be the only commenter who will miss Talk Wisdom; then again, maybe even you won’t miss it.

    Exodus 32 is about the making of an idol – the golden calf – which was a grievous sin. Commentator Robert Jamieson (via Blue Letter Bible) wrote:

    30-33. Moses said unto the people, Ye have sinned a great sin–Moses labored to show the people the heinous nature of their sin, and to bring them to repentance. But not content with that, he hastened more earnestly to intercede for them.

    32. blot me. . . out of thy book–an allusion to the registering of the living, and erasing the names of those who die. What warmth of affection did he evince for his brethren! How fully was he animated with the true spirit of a patriot, when he professed his willingness to die for them. But Christ actually died for His people ( Rom 5:8 ).

    35. the Lord plagued the people, because they made the calf–No immediate judgments were inflicted, but this early lapse into idolatry was always mentioned as an aggravation of their subsequent apostasies.

    David Guzik’s commentary goes into more detail:

    4. (Exo 32:14) God relents from His anger.

    So the Lord relented from the harm which He said He would do to His people.

    a. So the Lord relented: God answered Moses’ prayer. God was going to destroy the nation – all Moses had to do was leave God alone and let Him do it. But Moses did not leave God alone; he labored in intercession according to what He knew of the heart of God.

    b. So the Lord relented: In the King James Version this phrase is translated the Lord repented of the evil which he thought to do unto his people. Based on this, some believe God sometimes needs to repent of evil, or that God changes His mind.

    i. It is helpful to read other translations of this passage.
    · Then the Lord relented (NIV) · So the Lord changed His mind about the harm which He said He would do to His people (NASB) · The Lord turned from the evil which He had thought to do (Amplified) · The Lord was moved with compassion to save His people. (Septuagint Bible)
    ii. Numbers 23:19 says, God is not a man, that He should lie, nor a son of man, that He should repent. Has He said, and will He not do? Some say that these two passages contradict each other, and that Exodus 32 shows God repenting and changing while Numbers 23 says God never changes or repents. We can understand these passages by understanding that Moses wrote with what we call anthropomorphic, or “man-centered” language.He described the actions of God as they appeared to him. Moses’ prayer did not change God, but it did change the standing of the people in God’s sight – the people were now in a place of mercy, when before they were in a place of judgment.

    iii. Also, we can say that God did not go back on His word to either Moses or Israel. We understand the principle that God’s promises of judgment are inherently meant to call men to repentance and prayer and therefore avert the judgment (Ezekiel 33:13-16).

    iv. Some are frustrated because the Bible describes God’s actions in human terms, but they really cannot be described in any other way. “I suppose that I need not say that this verse speaks after the manner of men. I do not know after what other manner we can speak. To speak of God after the manner of God, is reserved for God himself; and mortal men could not comprehend such speech. In this sense, the Lord often speaks, not according to the literal fact, but according to the appearance of things to us, in order that we may understand so far as the human can comprehend the divine.” (Spurgeon)

    c. The Lord relented from the harm which He said He would do: God did not destroy Israel, and He knew that He would not destroy Israel. Yet He deliberately put Moses into this crucial place of intercession, so that Moses would display and develop God’s heart for the people, a heart of love and compassion. Moses prayed just as God wanted him to – as if heaven and earth, salvation or destruction, depended on his prayer. This is how God waits for us to pray.

    i. “We are not to think of Moses as altering God’s purpose towards Israel by this prayer, but as carrying it out: Moses was never more like God than in such moments, for he shared God’s mind and loving purpose.” (Cole)

    [Note: bold mine]

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  3. GMpilot Says:

    CJW:I will likely take additional long breaks from posting at this blog. Eventually, I may discontinue posting. You might be the only commenter who will miss Talk Wisdom; then again, maybe even you won’t miss it.

    Well, if you’ve lost your passion for blogging, then take more breaks, or shut it down. I preferred your old forum, and I’ve told you why. But if you do decide to end it, don’t drag it out for months like you did with your old site. Give it a quick and respectful death. I’m sure you still have a lot to say, but since January of ’17 the fire just ain’t been there. You used to be full of zeal, “speaking out against destructive social and political issues”. Now, you don’t seem to care any more.

    Those were evasive interpretations of Exodus 32. Jamieson doesn’t say (nor was it relevant) why God did or didn’t destroy his people. He certainly didn’t mention evil, which was the subject of your post. Guzik
    is a little more thorough, but he also fails to address the point of ‘evil’ directly. In quoting other versions, he chooses the softer-sounding versions and glosses over the fact that the Amplified Version also uses the actual word ‘evil’. He and Jamieson both emphasize that God didn’t actually perform the evil, but he still threatened to do it!
    You also completely ignored the Isaiah passage, even though you must have known I’d quote it. What do those scriptural scholars have to say about that?

    Getting back to my related question: “doing harm” to someone IS evil, isn’t it?

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    • christinewjc Says:

      So now you feel that it’s necessary for YOU to tell me what to do and/or how and when to end this blog? Sheesh!

      Why don’t you start your own blog?? You enjoy your attempts to demoralize, mock, and challenge God’s Word and believers who choose to follow His Living Word, Jesus Christ – right? Have at it via your own blog.

      I think that what I posted answered your questions and countered your accusations quite well.

      Throughout the OT, God always provided a way of escape from the coming judgment. Those who ignored the warnings and way of escape, perished.

      It’s the same thing regarding God’s way for mankind to escape deserved judgment in the New Testament. Believing in Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior through confession and repentance of one’s sins, provides the opportunity for reconciliation back unto God. Every person has that choice to make in his/her lifetime.

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  4. GMpilot Says:

    So now you feel that it’s necessary for YOU to tell me what to do and/or how and when to end this blog? Sheesh!

    I’m just remembering the old days of your former site, when you agonized for months about whether you should continue it. You asked for opinions then. Only Sothenes/Sosthenes and I had anything to say about it; then, as now, none of your other followers gave a damn. It’s only a suggestion, lady. No one says you have to follow it.

    I think that what I posted answered your questions and countered your accusations quite well.

    You thought wrong. Is doing harm to someone evil, or not? That’s a simple yes/no question, and you won’t answer it.
    In fact, you didn’t even answer your own question: ”What??? Isn’t evil both of those things?”

    Throughout the OT, God always provided a way of escape from the coming judgment. Those who ignored the warnings and way of escape, perished.

    Funny, I don’t recall readingchapter and verse where God ‘provided a way of escape’ for the people of Jericho. Only Rahab and her household got out. As for places such as Ai, Hebron, Jarmuth, Lachish, Eglon, Gezer, Debir, Geder, Hormah, Arad, Libnah, Adullam, Makkedah, Bethel, Tappuah…slaughtered to the last, right down to the livestock, and without any warning. For them, the only way of escape was at the point of swords held by Joshua’s army.
    God seemed to be more interested in seeing people perish than seeing them escape.

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  5. GMpilot Says:

    Yep, the grace or the mace.It was true then, and is true now.

    Like

    • christinewjc Says:

      Were you just being sarcastic through using that silly little rhyme? Typical.
      God’s grace is divine.
      It’s your choice to choose or reject grace from God.

      Word Origin and History for grace

      n.

      late 12c., “God’s favor or help,” from Old French grace “pardon, divine grace, mercy; favor, thanks; elegance, virtue” (12c.), from Latin gratia “favor, esteem, regard; pleasing quality, good will, gratitude” (source of Italian grazia, Spanish gracia), from gratus “pleasing, agreeable,” from PIE root *gwere- “to favor” (cf. Sanskrit grnati “sings, praises, announces,” Lithuanian giriu “to praise, celebrate,” Avestan gar- “to praise”).

      Mace

      [meys]

      Trademark.

      1.

      Also called Chemical Mace. a nonlethal spray containing purified tear gas and chemical solvents that temporarily incapacitate a person mainly by causing eye and skin irritations: used especially as a means of subduing rioters.

      verb (used with object), Maced, Macing.

      2.

      (sometimes lowercase) to attack with Mace spray.

      Origin

      1965-70; probably from mace1(in the sense “clublike weapon”)

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      • GMpilot Says:

        CJW:Were you just being sarcastic through using that silly little rhyme? Typical.
        God’s grace is divine.
        It’s your choice to choose or reject grace from God.

        That ‘silly little rhyme’ was good enough for you to quote it once. You must have found it annoying.
        As for choosing or rejecting this grace you talk about: since I don’t believe there is a God to offer or withhold it, the choice is irrelevant. AFAIK, grace is something some people say over their meals—especially those people who don’t actually raise the food themselves.
        Despite your claim, this God did notnot extend that grace to everyone, nor did he allow some people the luxury of choosing. I merely pointed that out, and you choose to ignore it.

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