Moms For America Rally For Freedom

June 28, 2019

Jon Voight has much wisdom to share in this video as he and Karen Vaughn discuss the tragic results of Socialism and why America must avoid going down that terrible road now or in the future!

If only the young people today who are cheering on the socialists in the Democrat party only knew the truth about it, they may be convinced to change their minds and reject socialism whole heartedly!

Why Is Good Friday Good?

April 19, 2019

Here is one of the best essays that I have ever read!

Why Is Good Friday Good

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“It is finished,” He cried. This work of Christ on the cross is called by theologians the doctrine of the atonement. The atonement is really at the heart of the gospel and the heart of Christianity itself, and I’d like to examine various aspects of the atonement, and show how each one is important for us in our Christian walk.

Expiation

A first aspect of the atonement is expiation. This is not a word we hear very often, but expiation refers to the removal of guilt. Because Christ endured the full curse of the law, he has born our guilt. We have had our guilty sentence removed. He has freed us from the burden that we had earned under the law.

Paul touches on this aspect in 2 Corinthians 5:21 when he says that Christ was made sin for us in order that we might be made the righteousness of God. That is, Christ was treated as sin, he was given what sin deserved, that is death, so that we might instead be given what righteousness deserved, which is life. Isaiah 53 also teaches this: “he has surely born our griefs and sorrows…upon him was laid the iniquity of us all.” Christ has taken our guilt from us; he has expiated us.

And this is crucial for us in our Christian life. Have you have ever lingered under a sense of looming guilt for your past sins? Have you had thoughts, deep down, that come up and tempt you to believe that God really doesn’t love you? Have you ever felt like God is punishing you for your foolishness, that there is an angry Father keeping you down, holding back his love, because you’re still a sinner–that because you’re still struggling with this sin or that sin, God is punishing you for your rebellion by holding back good things?

Well, the doctrine of expiation reminds us that our guilt has been removed. All of it. Christ has removed it completely by bearing it in his body on the cross. You’re not being punished again for sins that have already been removed, for guilt that has already been dealt with. You’re free in Christ.

God is not punishing you for something in your past. Indeed, if Christ has truly expiated our guilt on the cross, if he has truly removed our guilt and curse from sin, then God would be unjust to punish you again for something that has been removed. God cannot condemn you with the law once you have been declared not-guilty. Divine double jeopardy is impossible. Once the Son frees you from guilt, you are free indeed.

Remember your freedom from guilt the next time your feelings start to condemn you. Tell yourself again that you have been declared not guilty in Christ. Speak to yourself from Scripture, and ignore false feelings that try to put again upon you the yoke of the curse that was the result of the law. The doctrine of expiation ought to help us every day. It should help us to sleep at night. It should help us when our feelings condemn us. It should help us when the world would try to declare us guilty. Christ has cleared us from the sentence of guilt that we so rightfully earned.

Propitiation

Second, another aspect of the atonement is propitiation. Propitiation is another word that we don’t hear often these days. It is very much related to expiation; indeed, we might call it the other side of the same coin. If expiation was concerned with us and our guilt, then propitiation is concerned with God and his righteousness. Propitiation means the absorption or the appeasement of God’s wrath toward sin. Christ has taken the full weight of divine wrath that was earned by us because of our sin.

We see this idea throughout the Bible. For example, Isaiah 53 again says:

But he was pierced for our transgressions;
he was crushed for our iniquities;
upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace,
and with his wounds we are healed.

The apostle Paul does something similar in 1 Thessalonians 1:10, where he says Jesus “delivers us from the wrath to come.”

John uses the exact word “propitiation” in his first letter. 1 John 2 says that Christ “is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world.” 1 John 4:10 likewise says, “In this is love, not that we have loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.” Christ has taken the wrath that was earned by God’s people and absorbed it in his body. He felt the punishment that we deserved. He suffered that we might be free.

This is a doctrine that the world hates. They hate it because it assumes that there is an absolutely holy God who judges sin. They hate it because the doctrine assumes that they will be punished; indeed, they will feel wrath from God because of sin.

This doctrine is important for us to know because we can be tempted by Satan to believe that God is not happy with us. Our feelings and the lies of this world can lead us to believe that the bow of God’s wrath is still aimed at us, that we really have not been forgiven, and that can lead us to cower and fear. We can come to doubt our own salvation, and doubt the very goodness of God himself. But knowing that Christ has truly propitiated for the sins of his people means that we can rest in God’s goodness shown toward us. We must remind ourselves that God’s wrath is not aimed at us, even when we suffer or are afflicted. Even when times get tough, this is not the wrath of an angry God punishing you for sins, this is the tender guidance of a faithful Father who is seeking your good, even through the trials.

God does not fly off the handle. God does not hold grudges against you. God does not say that he forgives you and then pour out his judgement upon you. God is steady and unrelenting in his wrath against sin, but that wrath is not aimed at you because it has been assuaged by the work of the Son in your place. Trust that God is a good and loving Father to you, and that he has no hint of wrath stored up for you, only goodness and love.

Reconciliation

A third aspect of the atonement is reconciliation. This is a word that is much more familiar to us. On the cross, Christ has brought reconciliation between us and God. He has brought former enemies together and made them friends. This is really what the word atonement means. Atonement comes from an old English word that literally meant to be made “at one,” to be united, to be reconciled. We were at war with God. We were hated enemies, seditious traitors, having no hope of even coming into his presence to talk about peace. We were outside of the realm of his grace, and branded as enemies of the state. But Christ on the cross has made a way for us to be reunited with our God.

Romans 5:10-11 speaks of this reconciliation: “For if while we were enemies we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, now that we are reconciled, shall we be saved by his life. More than that, we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received reconciliation.” Similarly, Colossians 1:19-20 speaks of this work of reconciliation: For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross.”

God has made a way for us to have peace with God through the work of Christ on the cross. If you believe, you are no longer God’s enemy, but God’s friend. He no longer has ill-will toward you, but only blessings. He no longer feels hostility toward you, but only feels charity. No more enmity, only amity.

Believer, rest in the reconciliation that Christ has provided for you. Consider the great blessing this is for us; that we have been brought near to God. We’ve been made friends with him, and friends don’t mistreat one another. Friends look out for each other’s best interests. Friends defend one another. Friends provide for each other’s needs. This is what God does for us. He doesn’t mistreat us. He looks out for our best interests. He defends us. And he provides for our needs. Praise God and thank him for the reconciliation that he has provided for us in Christ.

Satisfaction

A fourth aspect of the atonement is satisfaction. When we hear that word now we usually think of something like happiness, or gratification. Like, “he smiled with satisfaction when he was finished mowing the grass.” But the word has a much stronger meaning. It usually refers to the payment of a debt. Indeed, the Greek word used here for “it is finished” is actually a transactional term. In that day, when you’d finish paying off a debt, they’d give you something like a receipt that said tetelestai across the top of it: “It is finished.” The debt has been paid in full.

That’s what Christ has done for us. In our sinful rebellion, we had robbed God of what was due to him. The service and obedience, the allegiance and faithfulness that should have been given to him, was taken away and given to another, the God of this world, Satan. We robbed God of the glory that ought to have been given to him. And that made us debtors to him. We owed him a debt we could never repay. But Christ on the cross made up for the debt that we owed. He makes the payment of his very own life to pay our debt in full.

Colossians 2:13-14 says: “And you, who were dead in your trespasses and the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made alive together with him, having forgiven us all our trespasses,  by canceling the record of debt that stood against us with its legal demands. This he set aside, nailing it to the cross.” Christ has canceled our record of debt. He has removed our file from the divine claims department, and stamped “paid in full” across our records. We don’t owe a single penny. You’ve been vouched for, you’ve been covered. Christ has completely removed our debt.

Believer, have you considered the debt that Christ has paid on your behalf? Do you praise the Son for his willingness to take on your foolish balances? Meditate on what the Son has removed from you. Contemplate the gift of the Son and his sacrifice. Thank God that the debt has been removed, because none of us could ever have removed it on our own. None of us had the means to pay for it. Indeed, the Bible says that none of us even had the inclination to remove the debt, if it weren’t for the work of the Holy Spirit. We were, prior to Christ, sprinting down the path toward hell, running up an even higher tab with each sin, sinking ourselves deeper and deeper into divine debt. But God, being rich in mercy, because he loved us, showed us the great debt that we owed him. He pulled us out of the mire of sinful debt, he nailed our invoice for sins on the cross, and he placed us back on a right standing at the cost of his very own Son.

That is the love of the Father. Not merely that he would be willing to buy his own enemies out of a debtor’s prison, but that he would do it even at the great cost of his very own Son’s life. Believer, don’t take for granted the great work of God on your behalf. Don’t neglect so great a salvation and spoil it on the sinful temptations of this world. Don’t rack up again a debt of foolishness that will bring nothing but suffering to you and dishonor to the Father. Walk in the path of faithfulness, and honor the One to whom we owe a debt that we could never afford. Rest in the work of satisfaction that the son has done on our behalf.

Substitution

A fifth aspect of the atonement is substitution. This aspect has been woven through all the other points thus far, and is really the most marvelous of the aspects of the atonement. Christ stands as a Substitute for those he came to save. The Bible speaks of this in many places. 2 Corinthians 5 tells us that God made him who had no sin to be sin for us. 1 Peter 2 says that he himself bore our sins in his body on our behalf. Even at the Last Supper, Jesus said, “this is my body which is broken for you.”

Christ’s work was done in our place. He was willing to give up everything and become nothing so that we might be saved. He stood in our place, even while we were sinners. He was the final Passover lamb that was slain, his blood spreading over his people so that their lives would be protected from the angel of death. He was the scapegoat that was cursed and sent outside the gate so that we might have our sins forgiven. He is our Substitute, that we might be treated not as we deserve, but as he deserved. Praise God for his inconceivable substitution.

Redemption

A sixth aspect of the atonement is redemption. To redeem something means to buy it back, usually from slavery of some kind. God has worked to free his people from bondage. Christ is our great Emancipator, our great Liberator, who has freed us from the chains of slavery to sin, slavery to the God of this world, and slavery to the cares of this world.

The Bible speaks of this great ransom price that Christ paid on behalf of his people. Matthew 20:28 says that Christ came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many. That is, his life was the cost needed to buy back his captured people. Ephesians 1:7 says that we have redemption through his blood. And 1 Peter 1:18-19 says that “you were ransomed from the futile ways inherited from your forefathers, not with perishable things such as silver or gold, but with the precious blood of Christ.” Christ redeemed us, bought us out of slavery, paid the ransom needed for our freedom because he loved us. And the cost of that redemption was his very own life. His blood was the redemption ticket. His pain and suffering was our emancipation proclamation. His life was the cost of our emancipation, and his perfection was the cost of our liberation.

Believer, when you are tempted to sin, remember that that you have been freed from slavery. When the temptation comes and it feels so strong–that sin you’ve struggled with for so long, that you feel powerless to overcome, that feels like it has its tail wrapped around your neck–remind yourself that you have been freed. You’ve been bought out of slavery to that sin. It is no longer your master. Remember that Christ’s work on the cross has liberated you from the power of sin. You don’t have to give in. You don’t have to succumb to the temptation. You’re freed from sin’s dominion. And you’ve been given the Holy Spirit to help you fight. You’re no longer trapped by your flesh; you canbattle against it. You’ve been redeemed from the power of sin, and you’ve been liberated from slavery to it. Praise God that he is a redeeming God! Thank him for the redemption we have through Christ Jesus.

Victory

A final aspect of Christ’s work on the cross victory. Christ is victorious.

This part of the atonement has been called Christus Victor throughout church history, especially in the early church, and it refers to Christ as the conquering King. Christ has defeated his enemies, subdued the cosmic foes, and succeeded in accomplishing his mission. Christ’s people–indeed all of creation–were under the power of the Evil One. But, because of Christ’s victory, Satan and his powers have been dealt the fatal blow, and it was done in the very way that seemed to be his defeat. The world looked on and saw Jesus hanging and dying on the cross, but the moment of his apparent defeat, was only the beginning of his coronation. His path to the grave was the first step in his victory march to Glory.

Colossians 2 tells us that God has “disarmed the rulers and authorities and put them to open shame by triumphing over them in Christ.” Christ is the victorious King that has defeated the Villain and saved the hostages.” He is the valiant Knight that slew the Dragon and saved his Bride, the Church. He is the rescuing God that saves a people for himself.

Believer, when you are doing battle against Satan and his temptations, remember these aspects of Christ’s work. Remember that you have been liberated by a victorious King, that you’ve been freed from slavery to sin, that you’ve been forgiven of all your debts, washed of your guilt, and have no wrath looming over you anymore. Preach these truths to yourself when you are weary from battle and tempted to give in to sin. Don’t let the lies of the Evil One distract you by taking away some part of Christ’s atoning work.

 

Hat Tip: Founders.org

Why Is Good Friday Good?

 

Unplanned

April 10, 2019

I saw the movie “Unplanned” on Monday afternoon.  My good friend Donna went with me.

I have been thinking about writing a post about the movie, but my best advice is to go see this important, true life, eye-opening film before reading any detailed reviews.  I watched the trailer, and that convinced me to buy a ticket to see (and financially support) this film.

Today, I read a blog post written by Elizabeth Prata (a Christian blogger that I greatly admire) and left a comment.

The End Time: A few thoughts about the abortion movie

[Note: Some movie spoilers at the link]

My comment (may still be awaiting moderation):

Elizabeth, I read your post and thought you made some good, important points.  I think you should go see the movie.

I didn’t want to see it at first because I knew I would cry and be deeply grieved seeing those two types of abortion.  But I wanted to support the movie’s effort to open the eyes of people re: the evil, pain, and regret that is involved for women who make such an egregious choice.

The movie does show how repentance can heal any woman who realizes (especially, later in life) what a terrible sin it is; then faces that fact, confronts it head on and asks for forgiveness for such a sin and is led towards redemption in Christ Jesus.

Also, think about all of the babies in the womb who will be given the chance of life rather than death in the womb.

*******

Update!

More good news as a result of the viewing of this movie!

Western Journalism: Unplsnned director reveals large number of abortion workers wanting to leave their jobs after seeing film.

Jesus, His Life

April 4, 2019

The History Channel has a series this Spring entitled, “Jesus, His Life.”  I was excited about it because I first heard about it on my favorite radio station, KLOVE.  The announcer stated that The History Channel financially supports (along with listeners who donate) KLOVE.

It was during the second episode where I found some assumptions made by the narrators that were not biblically accurate.  During Jesus’s baptism by John the Baptist, the claim was made that up until that time, Jesus didn’t really know who he was. Well, that is definitely not true!  Recall the account in the Bible when Jesus (age 12) was in the Temple (reading and commenting on the Torah – to the amazement of the listeners), and his parents were frantically looking for him?  What did Jesus say?

Luke 2:49 – And He said to them, “Why did you seek Me?  Did you not know that I must be about My Father’s business?

The historical information included in the series is interesting.  However, I wish that they had done more research in the Scriptures and/or gotten input from biblical scholars.

I recently ran across a new blog entitled Eye Of Prophecy…watch and wait.  Underneath, was a quote from Rev. 19:10 – For the essence of prophecy is to give a clear witness for Jesus.”

I found the post entitled, “Messiah’s Amazing Appearances Before He Was Born” quite fascinating and Biblically solid teaching!   I was reminded of my studies in Bible Study Fellowship years ago that covered Jesus’ pre-incarnate appearances in the Old Testament.  The post is very long, but worth reading!

Excerpt:

In one of several spectacular visions that John recorded in the book of Revelation, we read this bout Jesus Christ and his remarkable redemption for mankind that is truly universal in scope.

“…You are worthy to take the scroll and break its seals and open it.  For you were slaughtered, and your blood has ransomed people for God from every tribe and language and people and nation.  And you have caused them to become a Kingdom of priests for our God.  And they will reign on the earth.  Then I looked again, and I heard the voices of thousands and millions of angels…And they sang in a mighty chorus:

‘Worthy is the Lamb who was slaughtered–to receive  power and riches and wisdom and strength and honor and glory and blessing'” (Revelation 5:9-12)

This powerful passage is looking back with deep indebtedness to Messiah’s First Advent (appearance); and looking forward triumphantly to his Second Advent (return appearance).  Both Advents are the heart and soul of the Christian faith — a New (and better) Covenant birthed from a Judaic Old Testament heritage which also experienced appearances of the Messiah.

(Jesus came first as the sacrificial Lamb of God for redemption.  He will return as the Lion from the Tribe of Judah to rule and reign on the earth)

Read more at link above!

 

 

 

 

March 26 Tears of Adversity — Truth2Freedom’s Blog

March 26, 2019

 

Scripture reading: 1 Peter 1:3–9 key verse: 2 Timothy 2:1 You therefore, my son, be strong in the grace that is in Christ Jesus. For the peach lover, there is nothing quite like the sweet scent and taste of a ripe peach. However, a peach tree requires a certain number of cold days during the […]

via March 26 Tears of Adversity — Truth2Freedom’s Blog

This post describes the reasons for the adversity that we face in this life.  We, as Christians, are not in our real home yet.  The evil and suffering that we face and experience is purposeful; even though we may not know or understand the purpose at this time.  One day, we will  know.  Meanwhile, even though it’s very hard (sometimes extremely painful and sad) to go through them, they do turn out to be purposeful.

There is a song out that helps describe this phenomenon.  It’s called, “Maybe It’s OK.” by We Are Messengers.

 

 

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You therefore, my son, be strong in the grace that is in Christ Jesus.

For the peach lover, there is nothing quite like the sweet scent and taste of a ripe peach. However, a peach tree requires a certain number of cold days during the winter to produce quality peaches.

You can advance through your adversities because your afflictions likewise produce spiritual growth. Genuine spiritual fruit is unlikely to fully develop unless you are put into strenuous places. In adversity you grow in grace. Grace, God’s undeserved blessing, is hollow apart from suffering. Its richness, its strength, its nourishment, are released in adversity. Grace helps the weak to stand, the bruised to heal, the barren to blossom. In trouble you learn to “be strong in the grace that is in Christ Jesus” (2 Tim. 2:1).

You also grow in your knowledge of God. Paul wanted to know God above all. That intimate relationship blossomed in jail rooms, not hotel rooms. Adversity drives you into face–to–face dealings with the Father.

You grow, too, in your love for God’s Word. David said, “It is good for me that I have been afflicted; that I might learn thy statutes” (Ps. 119:71 kjv). Spiritual fruit is watered by the tears of adversity.

Thank You for Your grace in times of trouble. When I am weak, help me stand. Where I am barren, create blossoms. When I am bruised, heal me. Let the tears of my adversity water the spiritual fruit You want to produce in my life.[1]

Forgiveness

February 17, 2019

two women walking

I am continually amazed at the awesomeness of God!  He often leads me to an article or a blog post that I desperately needed to read.  Well, the following one SHOULD,  (IMHO) BE READ BY EVERY PERSON WHO CALLS THEMSELVES A CHRISTIAN!  Yes!  It is THAT GOOD and helpful!

The link is here: Standing in Grace: Forgiveness. The author has given permission to share the post with anyone, so here I am sharing it at my TalkWisdom blog. Please pass this along to others that may need to read this truth about forgiveness!

In Christ,
Christine

*******

Copy of post:

There’s nothing better than being forgiven – that sense of relief when someone overlooks your hurtful words, or covers the cost of a breakage themselves, or gives you a hug after you’ve been unkind. Forgiveness is like the sun coming out through the clouds after a dark storm. Forgiveness, though, is not just something to be enjoyed. For the Christian, forgiveness is something to be understood, appreciated and expressed. It is a significant biblical doctrine and an essential virtue with real warnings for us if it is absent from our lives. The chances are that this is an area you (and I) can grow in, so read on for more.

The Bible doesn’t give us a textbook definition and explanation of forgiveness. Instead, it teaches about it clearly through various prayers, psalms, historical events and parables. Essentially, forgiveness involves the cancelling of punishment and the expression of kindness. When Joseph forgave his brothers in Genesis he did not pay them back for all the wrongs they did to him (Gen 50:15); instead he provided for them, “reassured them and spoke kindly to them” (Gen 50:21). He cancelled their punishment and showed them (and their children) kindness.

In his prayer at the dedication of the temple, Solomon asked God to forgive the people when they sinned so that he might cancel their punishment and show them kindness in the form of rain, freedom or the restoration of land (1 Kings 8:22-52). The same aspects of the cancellation of punishment and the expression of kindness can be found in other parts of the Bible such as the Parable of the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11-31) or the testimony of Paul in 1 Timothy 1:12-17:

“Even though I was once a blasphemer and a persecutor and a violent man, I was shown mercy because I acted in ignorance and unbelief. The grace of our Lord was poured out on me abundantly, along with the faith and love that are in Christ Jesus.”

It’s important to grasp that forgiveness is costly to the forgiver. Offence and hurt is not simply shrugged off as if it is nothing. The aggrieved father in the Parable of the Prodigal Son gave up his rights, honour and pride to welcome back his son. God the Father gave up his son to secure our redemption and forgiveness of sin (Eph 1:7). Each of us, if facing the question of whether to forgive someone, instinctively feel what we might lose if we do so. Our loss could be things like pride, righteous indignation, relational superiority, or even something too hard to put into words, and thus we hesitate to forgive. There’s no doubt that forgiveness is costly.

That’s probably enough about the basics of forgiveness; let’s get into some points of application gathered under three headings: “We have been forgiven”, “We must forgive others” and “Forgiveness must shape our community”.

We have been forgiven

As Christians, a key part of our identity is that we have been forgiven. Psalm 32:1-2 says:

“Blessed is the one whose transgressions are forgiven, whose sins are covered. Blessed is the one whose sin the LORD does not count against them and in whose spirit is no deceit.”

This blessing is something we know and love as Christians. God has blessed us with “every spiritual blessing” (Eph 1:3) including the forgiveness of sins (Eph 1:7). Using the terms explained above, God has cancelled our punishment and now shows us kindness.

Forgiveness, though, is not a once off event like, say, regeneration. As we continue to sin we continue to ask God for forgiveness. There is a brilliant promise in 1 John 1:8-9:

“If we claim to be without sin, we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us all our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness.”

Confession and the receiving of forgiveness is best seen as a regular habit like brushing our teeth or washing our clothes. In fact, in my prayer diary I have a line on my daily page labelled ‘confession’. It’s there on the (safe) assumption that I have sinned in some way in the last 24 hours and should be coming to God about it. But also I should probably grow more in being quick to confess and ask for forgiveness at any hour of the day when I sin (and am aware of it).  So forgiveness is not a once off thing. Forgiveness is something we ask for and receive from God every day of our lives.

A final point under this heading of “We have been forgiven” is that our understanding of our own forgiveness has a direct relationship with our love for Jesus. If we doubt (consciously or subconsciously) whether we have much need of forgiveness our appreciation of Christ’s sacrifice will be small. Correspondingly, our love for Jesus will also be small. There will be little joy in our Christian life and things like Bible reading, giving, and singing in church will feel tiresome.

In contrast, when we grasp God’s forgiveness for us, we will have a great and growing love for Jesus. This is explained powerfully in Luke 7:36-50 in the account of Jesus being anointed by a woman in the home of a Pharisee (a passage worth meditating on deeply). Jesus concludes his rebuke of the Pharisee with these words in verse 47:

“Therefore, I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven – as her great love has shown. But whoever has been forgiven little loves little”.

The great love of the woman testifies to her appreciation of the forgiveness of her sins. Jesus challenges the Pharisee (and us) about our love for him and our grasp of our own forgiveness. To put it simply, the more we appreciate how much we’ve been forgiven, the more we will love Jesus.

We must forgive others

The second big application is that because of what God has done for us we must forgive others. There’s really no way around this. Although we are saved by God’s grace and mercy and not by our own good works (Titus 3:5) we must forgive others. It may not be easy or quick but God does call us to cancel punishment and show kindness to those who have offended us (not withstanding certain situations such as when it might be unsafe or the offender has died). Forgiveness is not optional for the Christian. In fact, withholding it from others puts our own status as forgiven children in danger.

We see this repeatedly in the teaching of Jesus, for example, in the Lord’s prayer:

“And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors” (Matthew 6:12).

Two verses on, Jesus explains the connection very clearly:

“For if you forgive other people when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. But if you do not forgive others their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins” (Matthew 6:14-15).

He speaks about the urgency of forgiveness in reference to our prayer life in Mark 11:25:
“And when you stand praying, if you hold anything against anyone, forgive them, so that your Father in heaven may forgive your sins.”
When Peter asked Jesus how many times he had to forgive people (thinking that seven times would likely impress him) Jesus replied with the Parable of the Unmerciful Servant (Matthew 18:21-35). The message is obvious: because of God’s great mercy towards us, we should have mercy towards others (verse 33). If we don’t, we will be judged and punished like the unmerciful servant. Jesus warns us:
“This is how my heavenly Father will treat each of you unless you forgive your brother or sister from your heart” (verse 35).
Being an unforgiving Christian is a terrible state to be in. In fact, “unforgiving” is one of the descriptors of ungodly people in the last days:
“But mark this: There will be terrible times in the last days. People will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boastful, proud, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, without love, unforgiving…” (2 Tim 3:1-3a)

Now again it’s worth stressing that forgiveness of others is not a work that earns for us God’s forgiveness. God’s forgiveness is freely granted, and our forgiveness is nearly always partial, imperfect or ‘a work in progress’. But it does not make sense for us to be selective about forgiveness, i.e. “let it be for me but not others”. Being a Christian is about being a “forgiveness person”. Forgiveness is what we love. Therefore, withholding forgiveness from others puts our own forgiveness at risk.

In practice, how it looks to cancel punishment and show kindness will look different in case to case. It might mean stopping hating the person, not bringing up their fault ever again and no longer criticising them to others. Kindness might mean genuinely praying for their good and speaking gently and warmly with them. Perhaps our pastors can help if we’re not sure.

Now for some of us forgiveness might seem like an impossible task. As we saw before, forgiveness is costly. The world is a dark and evil place and humans have done unspeakable things to each other. So for some of us the cost might feel too great.

Yet the call for us to forgive remains in Scripture. On this point we must remind ourselves that God knows us and our stories better even than we do. We must remind ourselves that despite our suffering, God is a good God and his word (including his teaching on forgiveness) is good and what we need to hear. One of my Bible college lecturers, Mark Baddeley, has written an excellent series of posts on this topic called “Forgiveness and Repentance”.  These are well worth reading, especially in considering more complex issues.*

So forgiveness will not be easy, it might take time – even years, and it might require the help of many people. But the call remains. The next step for you after reading this post might be to talk and pray with someone so that they can help you. But we cannot do nothing. Jesus calls on us to forgive others.

Forgiveness must shape our community

Lastly, forgiveness must shape our community. Forgiveness is not just an individual activity that we pursue alone, it’s something that should be a feature of our whole church community. Our heavenly father is “forgiving and good” (Psalm 86:5) so it’s right that his people should be like him in this way.

When Paul gives a series of instructions to the church in Ephesus he says:

“And do not grieve the Holy Spirit of God, with whom you were sealed for the day of redemption. Get rid of all bitterness, rage and anger, brawling and slander, along with every form of malice. Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ God forgave you” (Eph 4:32).

And similarly, to the Colossians, he writes:

“Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience. Bear with each other and forgive one another if any of you has a grievance against someone. Forgive as the Lord forgave you. And over all these virtues put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity” (Col 3:12-14).

We see from these passages that forgiveness should shape our community. Forgiveness is the opposite of bitterness and is an expression of love. For the church community, forgiveness is a like the oil in a car’s engine – always necessary so that the whole thing keeps moving. If it leaks out everything seizes up and the car breaks down. If it’s kept topped up and fresh the car can go along fine.

This communal feature of forgiveness also has a missional aspect. Our forgiveness (as an expression of love) testifies to the world about our relationship with Jesus. Being a forgiving community makes us stand out in the world. Jesus told his disciples:

“A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another” (John 13:34-35).

Being a forgiving church means that as unbelievers visit us and get to know us they will realise that something special is at work here. They will know that we are disciples of Jesus and sense that something supernatural is going on. For many, this will be a reason to investigate more and find out about Jesus.

Conclusion

We’ve covered a lot in this post about forgiveness! Forgiveness is about cancelling a punishment and showing kindness (at a cost). It is something that we have received from God because of Jesus and his sacrifice. It is something we need to pass on to others and it must shape our community.

This topic may be straightforward for you – perhaps you’ve got a few things to bring to God or you might need a small “course correction” in your Christian life. Or the topic might be very raw and painful. Either way it would be good to pray to God now: giving thanks for his forgiveness and asking for help in forgiving others. Please do speak with your Growth Group leader or pastors for help if this is a particularly tough area for you.

A good place to finish is another great verse from the Bible, this time from Micah:

“Who is a God like you, who pardons sins and forgives the transgression of the remnant of his inheritance? You do not stay angry forever but delight to show mercy” (Micah 7:18).

*I can’t find Mark’s posts on the internet right now but I have a copy or you can ask your own pastor.

Hat tip:

Standing In Grace.com

Your Soul Has Great Value

February 15, 2019

There are two really good posts that I wanted to share here today.  The first, from Truth 2 Freedom’s blog is entitled, Why So Many Religions and False Teachers?

There are a lot of false teachings in the world. Paganism, Gnosticism, Buddism, Hinduism, Sikhism, Taoism, Confucionism, Shaminism, even Judaism, Polytheism, Pantheism, Deism, Darwinism, Naturalism, Secular Humanism, Feminism, Agnosticism, Atheism, and Islam…ism.

All these different ways to get to God or be a god or deny God. But Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one gets to the Father but by me” (John 14:6).

Of course, not everything that claims to be of Christ is truly of Christ (Matthew 7:21). Like Catholicism, Mormonism, Unitarian Universalism, Oneness Pentecostalism, Heaven Tourism, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Eastern Orthodoxy, Word of Faith, the New Apostolic Reformation, and Rob Bell.

So why all these false religions and teachers? Why would God allow there to be so many, many lies? Two reasons: Testing and judgment.

The Bible says of those who refused to love the truth and so be saved, God “sends them a strong delusion, so that they may believe what is false, in order that all may be condemned who did not believe the truth but had pleasure in their unrighteousness” or their sin (2 Thessalonian 2:9-12).

InDeuteronomy 13:1-4we are told, “If a prophet or a dreamer of dreams arises among you and gives you a sign or a wonder, and he says, ‘Let us go after other gods,’ you shall not listen to that false prophet. For the Lord your God is testing you, to know whether you love the Lord with all your heart and with all your soul.”

When it comes down to it, there are only two religions: you either worship the created or the Creator, when we understand the text.

The second one is Five Reasons Why Your Soul Matters.

When our children were very young, we spoke about the soul like this: “I have a soul. My soul is inside me. I can’t see it, but it lasts forever.”

Jim Packer says that your soul is your “conscious personal self,” the “I” that knows itself as “me.” Your soul is the identity that makes you who you really are. It is the seat of your memory, and your feelings, and your imagination, and your convictions, and your desires, and your affections.

In Mark 8:35-36, Jesus says our soul has great value. Do you know why this is? Here are five reasons why your soul matters more than anything else you have.

1.) Your soul is breathed into you by God.

The LORD God formed the man of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature. (Genesis 2:7)

Grasping this is of huge importance in knowing who you are, and why your life is of such great value. Adam was created in two stages. There were two steps in the process by which God gave him life.

The first was that God, “formed the man of dust from the ground.” God formed a body. It was made from the dust of the ground. Now in this way, the man and the woman were similar to the animals: “Now out of the ground the LORD God had formed every beast of the field and every bird of the heavens” (Genesis 2:19).

There is a second stage in the creation of Adam which shows why we are different from animals:

The LORD God formed the man of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature. (Genesis 2:7)

God breathes life into this corpse, and this makes Adam different from the animals. He is more than a body. Adam is a living soul. This soul is capable of knowing God and enjoying God, and it is capable of sinning against God, something the animals cannot do.

This is at the heart of what God is saying when he says, “You are made in the image of God” (Genesis 1:26-27). God has breathed life into you and that life will never end.

2.) Your soul is the source of all your achievement.

The body apart from the spirit is dead. (James 2:26)

Think about everything that is important in your life, and you will say, “Yes, that came from my soul.” Think about this in relation to the world.

Think about music: The symphony, classic rock—where did these things come from? They came from the soul of the composer who wrote it.

Think about art: The ability to depict beauty came through the hands of the artist, but where did it come from? It came from the soul of the artist.

Then think about sports: You may say, “Surely sports depends on the body.” But James says, “the body without the spirit is dead” (James 2:26). Every great sports achievement has come through relentless commitment, disciplined desire, and the determination of the athlete, which is of course in the soul.

When I meet someone who is super fit, I want to say, “This has come from your soul. All the work you have put into sculpting your body came from a desire in your soul. Without that desire that was in your soul, you would be a couch potato!”

All that you achieve in life, everything that is achieved in the world, will arise from the life of the soul.

3.) Your soul is the cause of all your sin.

Each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire. (James 1:14)

Where does sin come from? James 1:14 is a very important verse in the Bible because it tells us how temptation works.

Temptation comes to us through the world, the flesh, and the devil. The problem is that, wherever it comes from, it attaches itself to the soul. Our souls are sticky toward sin. Sin attaches itself to our souls.

If this was not the case, then temptation would not be a problem for any of us. If it was pure, then when you saw a house that you couldn’t afford, your soul would say, “I can’t afford that, and I don’t need it,” and you would move on. Because of our sinful desires. When temptation comes, the soul receives it, retains it, welcomes it, embraces it and holds on to it.

The problem is that our souls are not pure. So what happens is that you see something, whatever it is, that someone else has, and you say, “That’s what I want,” and it sticks.

4.) Your soul will last forever.

Do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. (Matthew 10:28)

Your life had a beginning, but it does not have an end.

One day you will die and your body will be laid in the ground. But your soul will last forever. So, “Do not fear those who kill the body, but cannot kill the soul.” Your soul has an endless life. That’s why it’s so important. It’s immortal. It has a beginning, but it has no end.

I have a soul. It’s inside me. I can’t see it, but it lasts forever.

Some of you are actively trying to decide if you are going to follow Christ, knowing that it’s costly. You need to know what’s at stake. You try to save your life and you lose it. But Jesus says “If you lose your life to me, you will save it.”

5.) Your soul will experience everlasting joy or misery.

The poor man died and was carried by the angels to Abraham’s side. The rich man also died and was buried, and in Hades, being in torment, he lifted up his eyes and saw Abraham far off and Lazarus at his side. (Luke 16:22-23)

Our Lord tells the story of two men who died. One of them was carried to Abraham’s side. Certainly not the poor man’s body. That would have remained on the earth. So what was carried to Abraham’s side? Not the poor man’s body—his soul!

Then we read: “The rich man also died and was buried,” so everyone knew where his grave was. His body was placed in a rich man’s tomb, with words and dates carved into it. What then was in hades? Not the rich man’s body. It was in the tomb. It was the rich man’s soul!

The point here is very simple: Death takes life from the body, but not from the soul. When you die, your soul goes on to one of two places: One is a place of great joy. The other, according to Jesus, is a place of great torment. And there is a great gulf fixed between them (16:26). You can’t get from the one to the other in either direction.

There is a heaven to pursue and a hell to avoid. You have a soul: Your soul can be saved and it can be lost. To lose your soul is the ultimate disaster, because it is the only loss from which you can never recover.

Do you see now why your soul is so valuable?

[This article was adapted from Pastor Colin’s sermon, “Valuing Your Soul,” from his series Soul Care, Part One]

Five Reasons Why Your Soul Matters — Unlocking the Bible

Hat tip: Truth 2 Freedom’s Blog

Hat tips to all links.

Prayer and Steadfast Truth

February 14, 2019

Read the Bible online, easy-to-read format for online Bible study ...

H/T:  sermoncentral(dot)com

I appreciated reading Michele Lesley’s post What is Contemplative Prayer?

One big reason I liked the post is because it led me to a comprehensive link on Contemplative prayer vs. Biblical prayer over at Berean Research.

Another reason, was because some individuals who adhere to other “paths,” so to speak, (like Buddhism) tried to convince me that transcendental meditation isn’t really the “emptying” of the mind (however, it really is) and is a healthy way to live. I can understand someone feeling that way. After all, if it calms the person down and helps him or her not to panic in a crisis situation, it is understandable that they would want to recommend what has worked for them.

However, at the Berean Research article (linked above), we are informed that this “emptying of the mind” is not wise and certainly not biblical!

From the site:

Definition of Contemplative Prayer:  A form of Christian mysticism that allegedly brings about a mystical union with God

The mystical “spirituality” that is so popular in evangelical and charismatic circles today is a yearning for an experiential relationship with God that downplays the role of faith and Scripture and that exalts “transcendental” experiences that lift the individual from the earthly mundane into a higher “spiritual” plane. Biblical prayer is talking with God; mystical spirituality prayer is meditation and “centering” and other such things. Biblical Christianity is a patient walk of faith; mystical spirituality is more a flight of fancy. Biblical study is analyzing and meditating upon the literal truth of the Scripture; mystical spirituality focuses on a “deeper meaning”; it is more allegorical and “transcendental” than literal. — David W. Cloud.

Contemplative prayer (also referred to as centering prayer, breath prayer, meditation or listening prayer) is one of the most esteemed spiritual disciplines taught in spiritual formation. In both practice and purpose, contemplative prayer stands in contrast with what Scripture teaches about prayer. Practitioners believe that one must clear the mind of outside concerns so that God’s voice may more easily be heard and that one may be united with the “divine spark” within.

Advocates of contemplative prayer believe and teach that it is a necessary practice if one desires to become more like Christ. In claiming this, however, they often appeal to the practices of ancient Roman Catholic mystic monks rather than the Word of God.

Therein lies the key within the argument!  “…they often appeal to the practices of ancient Roman Catholic mystic monks rather than the Word of God.”

If you read the entire article, you will see the difference between “contemplative prayer” vs. biblical prayer.

Here are a few important paragraphs (and Bible verse links) about biblical prayer and why Christians should adhere to them:

Biblical Prayer

Prays according to the Scriptures. Micah 7:7Ps. 4:31 John 5:1415

Prays with both spirit and mind, not one or the other. 1 Cor 14:15

Talks to God the Father (Phil. 4:6) through Jesus Christ (John 16:23) in the power of the Holy Spirit.

Understands that what God has revealed in His Word is sufficient; new revelation is unnecessary. 2 Tim. 3:16–17

Biblical Prayer

Understands that prayer is ultimately a form of worship. It should glorify God alone. John 14:1314

Understands that prayer is an act of reverence, approaching the very throne of God to receive mercy and find grace.Heb. 4:16

Acknowledges and humbles oneself before the holy God of the universe. Prayer should affirm God’s sovereignty and majesty. Matt. 6:9

“Everything in prayer revolves around who God is, what God wants, and how God is to be glorified. That is the sum and substance of proper praying. 10

The Lord’s Prayer (Luke 11:2–4) offers a model of how Christians ought to pray as it “emphasizes the glory and supremacy of God.”11

Purposes to confess sin and acknowledge our position before God as rebellious sinners (e.g., Dan. 9:5–11;Matt. 6:12): “We are neither worthy of the things for which we pray, nor have we deserved them, but we ask that He would give them all to us by grace, for we daily sin much and surely deserve nothing but punishment.”12

Desires to align and submit our will to God’s. Ps. 86:11Matt. 6:10John 15:7;John 16:231 John 5:14

“While God communicates to us through the Bible, we respond to Him in prayer.”13

Pin by James on Jesus | Prayers, Prayer for family, Prayer quotesHT:  Pinterest

I suggest that every born-again Christian bookmark that Berean Research page!  Lots of additional links that will help you to discern truth vs. error.

These days, there are many churches that are being led by those who choose to go in the direction of contemplative prayer (or even worse – into heresies) which can lead people astray.  It’s sad, but true.

Young Christians (or even older Christians who are sadly biblically illiterate) can be easily led away from the true Gospel of Christ.  The Bible tells us that the closer we get to the end times, the more this will happen.

I suggest reading and studying the book of Jude carefully! It is filled with warnings to believers back when it was written!  It is filled with warnings for all believers throughout the centuries up until this very day!

Jde 1:3
Beloved, while I was very diligent to write to you concerning our common salvation, I found it necessary to write to you exhorting you to contend earnestly for the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints.

Hat tips to all links.

Prayer and Steadfast Truth

February 14, 2019

Read the Bible online, easy-to-read format for online Bible study ...

H/T:  sermoncentral(dot)com

I appreciated reading Michele Lesley’s post What is Contemplative Prayer?

One big reason I liked the post is because it led me to a comprehensive link on Contemplative prayer vs. Biblical prayer over at Berean Research.

Another reason, was because some individuals who adhere to other “paths,” so to speak, (like Buddhism) tried to convince me that transcendental meditation isn’t really the “emptying” of the mind (however, it really is) and is a healthy way to live. I can understand someone feeling that way. After all, if it calms the person down and helps him or her not to panic in a crisis situation, it is understandable that they would want to recommend what has worked for them.

However, at the Berean Research article (linked above), we are informed that this “emptying of the mind” is not wise and certainly not biblical!

From the site:

Definition of Contemplative Prayer:  A form of Christian mysticism that allegedly brings about a mystical union with God

The mystical “spirituality” that is so popular in evangelical and charismatic circles today is a yearning for an experiential relationship with God that downplays the role of faith and Scripture and that exalts “transcendental” experiences that lift the individual from the earthly mundane into a higher “spiritual” plane. Biblical prayer is talking with God; mystical spirituality prayer is meditation and “centering” and other such things. Biblical Christianity is a patient walk of faith; mystical spirituality is more a flight of fancy. Biblical study is analyzing and meditating upon the literal truth of the Scripture; mystical spirituality focuses on a “deeper meaning”; it is more allegorical and “transcendental” than literal. — David W. Cloud.

Contemplative prayer (also referred to as centering prayer, breath prayer, meditation or listening prayer) is one of the most esteemed spiritual disciplines taught in spiritual formation. In both practice and purpose, contemplative prayer stands in contrast with what Scripture teaches about prayer. Practitioners believe that one must clear the mind of outside concerns so that God’s voice may more easily be heard and that one may be united with the “divine spark” within.

Advocates of contemplative prayer believe and teach that it is a necessary practice if one desires to become more like Christ. In claiming this, however, they often appeal to the practices of ancient Roman Catholic mystic monks rather than the Word of God.

Therein lies the key within the argument!  “…they often appeal to the practices of ancient Roman Catholic mystic monks rather than the Word of God.”

If you read the entire article, you will see the difference between “contemplative prayer” vs. biblical prayer.

Here are a few important paragraphs (and Bible verse links) about biblical prayer and why Christians should adhere to them:

Biblical Prayer

Prays according to the Scriptures. Micah 7:7Ps. 4:31 John 5:1415

Prays with both spirit and mind, not one or the other. 1 Cor 14:15

Talks to God the Father (Phil. 4:6) through Jesus Christ (John 16:23) in the power of the Holy Spirit.

Understands that what God has revealed in His Word is sufficient; new revelation is unnecessary. 2 Tim. 3:16–17

Biblical Prayer

Understands that prayer is ultimately a form of worship. It should glorify God alone. John 14:1314

Understands that prayer is an act of reverence, approaching the very throne of God to receive mercy and find grace.Heb. 4:16

Acknowledges and humbles oneself before the holy God of the universe. Prayer should affirm God’s sovereignty and majesty. Matt. 6:9

“Everything in prayer revolves around who God is, what God wants, and how God is to be glorified. That is the sum and substance of proper praying. 10

The Lord’s Prayer (Luke 11:2–4) offers a model of how Christians ought to pray as it “emphasizes the glory and supremacy of God.”11

Purposes to confess sin and acknowledge our position before God as rebellious sinners (e.g., Dan. 9:5–11;Matt. 6:12): “We are neither worthy of the things for which we pray, nor have we deserved them, but we ask that He would give them all to us by grace, for we daily sin much and surely deserve nothing but punishment.”12

Desires to align and submit our will to God’s. Ps. 86:11Matt. 6:10John 15:7;John 16:231 John 5:14

“While God communicates to us through the Bible, we respond to Him in prayer.”13

Pin by James on Jesus | Prayers, Prayer for family, Prayer quotesHT:  Pinterest

I suggest that every born-again Christian bookmark that Berean Research page!  Lots of additional links that will help you to discern truth vs. error.

These days, there are many churches that are being led by those who choose to go in the direction of contemplative prayer (or even worse – into heresies) which can lead people astray.  It’s sad, but true.

Young Christians (or even older Christians who are sadly biblically illiterate) can be easily led away from the true Gospel of Christ.  The Bible tells us that the closer we get to the end times, the more this will happen.

I suggest reading and studying the book of Jude carefully! It is filled with warnings to believers back when it was written!  It is filled with warnings for all believers throughout the centuries up until this very day!

Jde 1:3
Beloved, while I was very diligent to write to you concerning our common salvation, I found it necessary to write to you exhorting you to contend earnestly for the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints.

Hat tips to all links.

20 Passages from George Orwell’s “1984” Book That Have Become Reality

January 28, 2019

Most thinking people who aren’t victims of the “lying, pomposity, smugness and groupthink” crowd (hat tip: Tucker Carlson Tonight) realize the fact that we are living in an “age of animosity;”  not only politically, but also socially, morally, intellectually, and spiritually. This is mostly thanks to the media of mass deception (a.k.a. “Fake News”); as well as the deliberate and shameful censorship of previously successful conservative groups and websites by big tech companies; mostly because the far leftist execs don’t like their content and want to shut them up online. (Hat Tip: Wintery Knight)

Watch this brief video, then come back here.

Fox News: Could the real trouble for Democrats in 2020 be ex–Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz? (Hat tip: Fox News Channel)

I did not know much about the man until I watched the video and read the article. The comments from the Democrat during the interview were measured, but his comments sounded more reluctantly stated than anything else. The Republican, however, had a much better grasp upon the subject matter and didn’t hold back his thoughts regarding Mr. Schultz.

The Bible tells us through Solomon that “there isn’t anything new under the sun.” There has been, and always will be those who are flagrantly guilty of perpetuating “lying, pomposity, smugness and groupthink” (a.k.a. dangerous ideology). It seems to me that such activities are much more ratcheted up over the last 30 years or so; and even more “in your face” since Donald Trump was elected president.

Early this morning, I read a very interesting (and, quite frankly, frightening) post via Truth2Freedom’s blog.. The post originated over at Free Republic which is another website that has often been targeted for censorship.

This particular post, shares how 20 passages from George Orwell’s classic novel “1984” (written in 1949) has becomes a reality.

Here is a copy of the post:

20 passages from george orwell’s 1984 that have become reality

Posted on ‎1‎/‎27‎/‎2019‎ ‎10‎:‎15‎:‎54‎ ‎PM by vannrox

As the back cover of my cheap paperback copy of George Orwell’s masterpiece dictates…

1984 has come and gone, but George Orwell’s prophetic, nightmarish vision in 1949 of the world we were becoming is timelier than ever. 1984 is still the great modern classic of Negative Utopia.

I recently revisited this book after many years of absence, and while reading along I highlighted many quotes and passages which struck me as relevant to the “social justice” zeitgeist of the late 2010’s. To little surprise, I discovered that what the political left seeks in this day and age is well and truly like the negative utopia described in this classic story.

Here are twenty passages from the book which many of us have to live suffer through everyday in “it’s the current year!”

1. Telescreen

The instrument (the telescreen, it was called) could be dimmed, but there was no way of shutting it off completely.

Travelers in U.S. airports are tortured with CNN Fake News which they cannot escape. The numerous “telescreens” may not be shut off.

2. Thought police

The patrols did not matter, however. Only the Thought Police mattered.

3. Gullible women

It was always the women, and above all the young ones, who were the most bigoted adherents of the Party, the swallowers of slogans, the amateur spies and nosers-out of unorthodoxy.

A proud and “diverse” photo of a Huffington Post / Big Brother staff meeting. What can they do to blame white males again today?

4. Female useful idiots

The idea had even crossed his mind that she might be an agent of the Thought Police. That, it was true, was very unlikely. Still, he continued to feel a peculiar uneasiness, which had fear mixed up in it as well as hostility, whenever she was anywhere near him.

5. Monsters of hate

The next moment a hideous, grinding screech, as of some monstrous machine running without oil, burst from the big telescreen at the end of the room. It was a noise that set one’s teeth on edge and bristled the hair at the back of one’s neck. The Hate had started.

6. The opposition

The program of the Two Minutes Hate varied from day-to-day, but there was none in which Goldstein [Donald Trump] was not the principal figure. He was the primal traitor, the earliest defiler of the Party’s purity. All subsequent crimes against the Party, all treacheries, acts of sabotage, heresies, deviations, sprang directly out of his teaching.

7. Conformity

To dissemble your feelings, to control your face, to do what everyone else was doing, was an instinctive reaction.

Vagina-Hat Lemmings of “The Party” at the Women’s March

8. No escape

Thought-crime was not a thing that could be concealed forever. You might dodge successfully for a while, even for years, but sooner or later they were bound to get you.

According to the media, this man is a “pro-rape” advocate who harms women and lives in his mother’s basement

9. Erasing history

People simply disappeared, always during the night. Your name was removed from the registers, every record of everything you had ever done was wiped out, your one-time existence was denied and then forgotten. You were abolished, annihilated: vaporized was the usual word.

Confederate statues being removed in Baltimore, in the middle of the night, and with no public notice.

10. Male useful idiots

Parson’s [Tim Wise] was Winston’s fellow employee at the Ministry of Truth. He was a fattish but active man of paralyzing stupidity, a mass of imbecile enthusiasms–one of those completely unquestioning, devoted drudges on whom, more even than on the Thought Police, the stability of the Party depended.

“Yeah I live in an almost all-white neighborhood in Nashville, and I send my daughters to an almost all-white private school, but white folks are BAD M’kay?”

11. Indoctrinating children

It was almost normal for people over thirty to be frightened of their own children. And with good reason, for hardly a week passed in which the Times did not carry a paragraph describing how some eavesdropping little sneak–“child hero” was the phrase generally used–had overheard some compromising remark and denounced his parents to the Thought Police.

12. Literally Hitler

The enemy of the moment always represented absolute evil, and it followed that any past or future agreement with him was impossible.

Nazi’s are deemed to be the world’s biggest villain, so make sure to portray the enemy of the moment like he is (literally) Hitler

13. Rewriting history

Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. In this way every prediction made by the Party could be shown by documentary evidence to have been correct; nor was any item of news, or any expression of opinion, which conflicted with the needs of the moment, ever allowed to remain on record. All history was a palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary.

They wuz Kangz!

14. Fake news

Beyond, above, below, were other swarms of workers engaged in an unimaginable multitude of jobs. There were the huge printing shops with their sub-editors, their typography experts, and their elaborately equipped studios for the faking of photographs.

Fake News CNN up to their usual propaganda

15. Threats to state power

One of these days, thought Winston with sudden deep conviction, Syme [Jared Taylor] will be vaporized. He is too intelligent. He sees too clearly and speaks too plainly. The Party does not like such people. One day he will disappear. It is written in his face.

Some of Jared Taylor’s well researched and informative videos on ‘Race and Intelligence‘ have already been “vaporized” by Big Brother Youtube for failing to march lockstep with social justice.

16. Narrative zombies

As he watched the eyeless face with the jaw moving rapidly up and down, Winston had a curious feeling that this was not a real human being but some kind of dummy. It was not the man’s brain that was speaking; it was his larynx. The stuff that was coming out of him consisted of words, but it was not speech in the true sense: it was a noise uttered in unconsciousness, like the quacking of a duck.

Cenk Uygur: “Quack Quack Quack”

17. Shaping reality

In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it. It was inevitable that they should make that claim sooner or later: the logic of their position demanded it. Not merely the validity of experience, but the very existence of external reality was tacitly denied by their philosophy. The heresy of heresies was common sense.

gender chart

Only “Female” and “Male” are true. But in ‘1984’ world you may identify as an Attack Helicopter. Common sense must be vaporized.

18. Lowest common denominator

There was a small bookcase in the other corner, and Winston had already gravitated toward it. It contained nothing but rubbish. The hunting-down and destruction of books had been done with the same thoroughness in the prole quarters as everywhere else.

social justice library

19. Changing the past

One could not learn history from architecture any more than one could learn it from books. Statues, inscriptions, memorial stones, the names of streets–anything that might throw light upon the past had been systematically altered.

20. Destruction of sex relations

He thought of her naked, youthful body, as he had seen it in his dream. He had imagined her a fool like all the rest of them, her head stuffed with lies and hatred, her belly full of ice. A kind of fever seized him at the thought he might lose her, the white youthful body might slip away from him!

feminism

Before feminism and after feminism

Truly captivating stuff from a literary classic. Also bear in mind that these passages were only taken out of the first 100 pages of the book. Such is the scope of modern-day social justice insanity that many great passages cannot fit in just one article.

Hat tips to all links.

 

Groupthink

GroupthinkHat tip for graphics:  slideshare(dot)net


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WHENEVER ANY FORM OF GOVERNMENT BECOMES DESTRUCTIVE OF THESE ENDS (LIFE,LIBERTY,AND THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS) IT IS THE RIGHT OF THE PEOPLE TO ALTER OR ABOLISH IT, AND TO INSTITUTE A NEW GOVERNMENT...

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